Sang’s song PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 05 November 2018 12:40

BEHIND  THE  LINES

BY BOB JALDON

Cesar “Sang” Jimenez, “El Hombre de Ayala”, renowned legislator and college orator, is proud of the 2019 Executive Budget, labeling it as pro-poor, pro-underprivileged and pro-health. It promotes, says Sang, a compassionate society. Sang recognizes the power of words, like, “shameless” and “scandalous”, but does not use these offensive words to stir hatred and arouse repugnance, especially when blurted by men of great knowledge, wisdom and high moral standards.

Raised by the Jesuits in college and went on to become a lawyer first and then as city councilor, Sang was a “tuta” of the Lobregats in the early 90s after parting ways with the “opposition” then led by the late  Mayor Vitaliano D. Agan, a fellow barrister. He carried the portmanteau of the gracious Mrs. Maria Clara L. Lobregat wherever she went. He was introduced as the “better” Jimenez.

Last Friday, All Souls’ Day, Sang began to denounce Mayor Beng Climaco-Salazar’s political adversaries for maliciously scheming against next year’s budget. It’s either the “Rojos” are for the budget or totally against it. There can be no middle-of-the-roaders. So, since the “Reds” are against the 2019 budget, they should refrain from collecting their salaries and fat allowances starting in January, next year, challenged Jimenez, for Sang is one lawyer who can make an argument and speak out to persuade his audience as only one distinct person could — Barack Obama.

Dear members of the incorruptible, distinguished city council: In 1630, in a homily aboard the “Arbella”, Puritan lawyer John Winthrop read a passage from Matthew 5:14 — “a city that is set on a hill cannot be hid.” This is why the budget is made transparent for everyone to scrutinize.

Mrs. Climaco-Salazar has been elected to the House of Representatives thrice and the same number of times as a member of the city council. She is seeking her third and last term as mayor of this developing, highly-urbanized, soon-to-be independent federal city of Zamboanga. Through the 2019 budget, she has articulated the need for social justice, better education, and law and order. She has not broken her covenant with the people who resoundingly elected her twice as mayor. She has not failed in her faithfulness to God and her people. If the infrastructure item in the budget is bloated as alleged, that gives room to corruption, then such malady or perceived malfeasance should be denounced in no unconditional terms when the misdeed is committed. Not before.

Susmariajosep. Why must the opinion of one hold the “Reds” hostage, who by their high education and esteemed family backgrounds can make decisions on their own based on moral and even philosophical standards? Now that they got the attention of the media for such slanderous words of “shameless” and “scandalous”, two words molded in a song by Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs in 1968, what’s next? Maybe, the way Madam Beng hops the Zumba or the unfashionable way that she dresses up, unlike her fashionista beloved mother. Who knows?

Zamboanga City is an object, an object worth fighting for. If criticizing people is the best way of gaining votes, then the “Reds” have gained none. The prudent management of city funds is better than blind, malicious accusation of its use. Trust should be laid on  Madam Beng and those who voted for the budget. I see the “shameless” and “scandalous” proposed budget as the administration’s pouring of love for the people. It shows its attachment to the people, for they have a deep stake in this glorious local government institution.

In all his 21 years, and counting, in public service, Mr. Celso L. Lobregat— son of the sophisticated philanthropist, high-minded, glorious, even monumental Mrs. Maria Clara Lorenzo-Lobregat — preached unity and continuity, as did his mother, as the bulwark of his service. Ironically, he never worked to unite with the quarrelsome opposition. Even with his mother’s “man hunto, hunto quita” slogan, Mr. Lobregat drew his own priorities of government to steer the politically-embattled city to progress. He broke ties with the “originals”, even with his closest allies and friends, picking up new ones in the process — those who would follow his line of thinking and his style of governance. Continuing to do so may lead to his imminent downfall.